Quiet Water Symposium 2017

Saturday, March 4, 9am-5:30pm
Pavilion for Livestock and Agriculture Education
4301 Farm Lane, Lansing
Adults $10; Students $5; 12 and under Free

quiet-water-symposium-2017Join the Huron River National Water Trail and over 200 exhibitors and speakers at this year’s indoor show for Michigan’s outdoor enthusiasts. Its the perfect place to plan your summer adventures.

Attend a talk given by experts and authors who entertain with personal stories, photos and practical tips on camping, paddling, biking, adventure travel and more. Featured locations include Lake Superior, Thunder Bay, Isle Royale, Manitou Islands, the North Channel, the Northern Forest Canoe Trail, Canadian Shield, Northern Yukon, Cuba, Croatia, Zambia . . . and many more.

Walk the show where water and bike trail representatives, outfitters, book sellers, and wood boat artisans from across Michigan share resources and information.

From beginner to adventurer, there is something for everyone at the Quiet Water Symposium. Trust us, it is well worth the trip to Lansing!



News to Us

The Huron. Credit: John Lloyd.

The Huron. Credit: John Lloyd.

This month in News to Us we cover some of the ongoing discussions about the impact of the new federal administration on water protection, a study that reveals we could be doing better on funding research on chemicals,  a couple of stories on Michigan fish and a Michigan dam removal success story.

Uh oh. Studies find little U.S. money to study ecological impacts of chemicals The number of chemicals being introduced to the environment are mind boggling both in number and quantity. At HRWC we are considering which of them are of most concern in the Huron. This article summarizes two studies that found steep declines in funding for research on the impacts of chemicals to our natural systems. Without this critical research our understanding of the problems affecting ecosystems and the solutions necessary to protect them is limited.

Scott Pruitt Is Seen Cutting the E.P.A. With a Scalpel, Not a Cleaver The EPA plays an incredibly valuable role in protecting our country’s freshwater. The agency administers the Clean Water Act, provides tools and resources for water protection, and funds an irreplaceable portion of freshwater restoration and protection efforts. Speculation about the nominee to head the EPA, Scott Pruitt, is that he will be more of a foe to the agency he leads than a friend. Here is one piece that describes how Pruitt may undermine the ability of the EPA to protect our air and water.

Panelists discuss the future of environmental sustainability under Trump adminstration  HRWC Executive Director, Laura Rubin was one of several panelists invited to discuss sustainability in the new federal administration at the University of Michigan. One key take home message was that state and local action are critical. And as for the average citizen concerned about the direction this administration is taking on the environment, advice from the panel is to ‘engage, engage, engage’. See the full forum here.

In Michigan, a Fight Over the Future of a Fabled Trout River  Conflict continues over the fate of a fish hatchery expansion that could negatively impact one of Michigan’s most prized rivers, the Au Sable.  The river supports one of the best trout populations this side of the Rocky Mountains. Those opposing the expansion are worried about added nutrients to the river from the hatchery. The New York Times covered the ongoing debate.

Walleye run could start earlier than normal; now is time to prepare An unseasonably warm winter has anglers gearing up for an early walleye run. Walleye use water temperature to queue their annual migration up into the Great Lakes tributaries where they spawn. The Huron sees a walleye run up to Flat Rock where the dam there halts further movement of the fish.

By 2020, 90% of Michigan’s dams will meet or exceed their design life  There are 2600 dams in our state. Listen in on a Stateside interview with Patrick Ertel from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Division who shares the story of Michigan’s Boardman River. It is one of the most comprehensive dam removal and restoration projects in Michigan’s history and one of the largest such projects in the Great Lakes Basin. Our own restoration efforts on Mill Creek here in the Huron show that dam removals can have big community benefits and cost a lot less.



Fly Fishing Film Tour 2017

Friday, February 24, 7pm
Michigan Theater, 603 East Liberty Street, Ann Arbor

Love rivers? Fishing? Both? Our friends at Schultz Outfitters are hosting this year’s Fly Fishing Film Tour. The spectacular locations, notable characters, unique storylines and unparalleled fishing in this year’s line up of films are guaranteed to lead you on an adventure around the globe! Check out the Tour’s Stoke Reel for a taste. Tickets available at the shop.

The Ozernaya River, Russia. Credit: Rolf Nylinder.

The Ozernaya River, Russia. Credit: Rolf Nylinder.

Need convincing? Just take a look at the photo and description for “At the End of a Rainbow” which features the Ozernaya River in a remote corner of Kamchatka in Far East Russia.

In one of the most intact eco-systems left in the Northern Pacific, rainbow trout eat mice for breakfast, and the salmon run in the hundreds of thousands. This bounty attracts two kinds of people; those who want to protect, and those who want to exploit. Rampant salmon poaching is big business on Kamchatka, and once the salmon are gone, entire eco-systems collapse. “At the End of a Rainbow” explores how fly fishing can help protect the wilderness, and celebrates the beauty and wonder of one of the most vibrant places on Earth.

When you get to the F3T, stop by the HRWC booth to learn about efforts to protect our home waters and our river’s well-known bass fishery!



2016 Results Are In! (at least some of them)

Watershed tour stop showing phosphorus levels at sites on South Ore Creek

Watershed tour stop showing phosphorus levels at sites on South Ore Creek

In January, HRWC staff and volunteers got together to celebrate another successful season of data collection. Call it a Water-Nerd-Fest, if you like, as we all geeked-out on the results from this year’s monitoring. The new twist this year was structuring our findings to focus on different tributary “Creeksheds,” similar to the way we have developed Creekshed Reports. Using that framework, we took volunteers on a tour of the watershed from the mouth at Lake Erie to the river’s named origin flowing out of Big Lake.

Phosphorus levels in the middle section of the Huron River Watershed

Phosphorus levels in the middle section of the Huron River Watershed

Stevi Kosloskey and I talked about results from the Water Quality Monitoring Program, in which we sample stream water chemistry and track stream flows. The results from 2016 and past years really provide a tale of three different watersheds: the lower section is characterized by lots of developed land which corresponds with generally poorer water quality. The middle section also has some development, but is also mixed with forest and agriculture lands, and much effort and resources have been invested in treating urban runoff (see Summer 2016 and 2015 newsletter articles for more detailed analysis of the impacts of those investments). Subsequently, we saw our lowest phosphorus concentrations from that region in 2016 and the bacteria levels are strongly declining as well. Upstream in the Chain of Lakes region, there is much less development and large areas of protected lands, and we see generally better water quality, though there are signs of decline to keep our eyes on.

We also discussed findings from River Roundup, habitat and Bioreserve programs. Sign-up to volunteer for these in 2017 so you can join the fun, learn more about the watershed, and get your science geek on!



Preparing the Huron for Climate Change

Given the noticeably mild weather this fall and winter, it may come as no surprise that 2016 was just declared the hottest year on record. 2015 held the same title as did 2014.  In other words, we have broken the record for “hottest year on record” for three consecutive years. Climate Change is a threat that affects everyone and everything in some way. We must aggressively continue global efforts to reduce the amount of greenhouse gases emitted. At the same time, communities everywhere are preparing for new weather extremes.  We are one of them. Here’s a new film about our work to help prepare the Huron River for climate change. Please share this with friends to get the word out on how we are protecting the future of our local water.

HRWC would like to thank the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Climate Adaptation Fund made possible by funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation for the support of this project and the creation of the film. To learn more about climate change in southeast Michigan and what HRWC is doing to address this threat visit http://www.hrwc.org/the-watershed/threats/climate-change/



News to US

30158738441_16b87bda57_oNews to Us this month provides an update on the dioxane contamination case. Also, two new projects bring money to improve water quality in the Huron. Finally, read articles on two widespread water quality issues – PAH contamination due to coaltar pavement sealers and bacterial pollution from failing septic systems.

Judge grants local intervention in Ann Arbor dioxane pollution case In a precedent setting decision, Judge Connors granted intervention on legal negotiations associated with the Gelman dioxane plume to HRWC. Washtenaw County and the City of Ann Arbor were also granted intervention. As the Attorney General’s counsel stated, “…. in our experience we’ve never seen a circumstance where an environmental policy group or a public interest group basically has intervened and been a participant in the negotiation of a consent judgment, whether it’s the very first negotiation of a consent judgment, or in this case the fourth amendment to a consent judgment.” HRWC will represent the needs of the river ecosystem and recreational users.

$1.8M in federal funds to help protect Huron River watershed A significant award through a federal Farm Bill program is coming to the Huron. These funds will be used to protect natural and farmed lands and support farming practices that protect water quality. Efforts led by the Legacy Land Conservancy will be focused on the headwaters of the Huron in Oakland, Livingston and western Washtenaw counties. HRWC is one of many local groups involved in this unique partnership.

$675K design contract for new tunnel to Ann Arbor riverfront approved A major stormwater management and river access project in Ann Arbor now has the funding it needs to move forward. A tunnel will be built underneath the railroad tracks connecting pedestrians from Depot Street to the Border-to-Border trail and Argo park. This tunnel will also act as a release valve for stormwater which tends to back up and flood land and property in this low lying area where Allen Creek meets the Huron River.

Coal tar main source of toxicity in streams A recent study found that up to 94% of PAHs found in sediments in Milwaukee-area creeks and streams came from coaltar pavement sealants and that 78% of all samples had enough PAH content to be considered toxic. PAHs are a toxic class of chemicals that impact aquatic life and human health. HRWC has been working, in the face of mounting evidence, to ban the use of coaltar and other high PAH sealcoats to reduce the impacts of this unnecessary contaminant. Learn more about area bans at hrwc.org/coaltar

Aging septic systems fouling Michigan waters Did you know that Michigan is the only state that does not regulate septic systems? As many as 1.4 million of these systems exist within our state, very few are under any inspection and maintenance requirements. Sixty four rivers sampled in Michigan had bacterial contamination that was traced back to human sources. This is one of the biggest threats to Michigan waterways. HRWC has more information on this issue and how you can maintain your septic system here and will be investing in septic system education in Honey Creek, a tributary of the Huron considering impaired by the State for bacterial contamination.



Stonefly Search and Volunteer Night

Start 2017 at our volunteer events this week!


Volunteer Night
Thursday, January 19
6-8pm
HRWC Offices
1100 N Main Street, Ann Arbor

Join HRWC staff, volunteers and partner organizations in recapping and appreciating the 2016 field season. We collect and analyze a lot of data that tells us about the health of the Huron River and its watershed. HRWC will present results and share stories to entertain and enchant at this must-go event!

This evening you will witness… The amazing and mesmerizing Stevi Kosloskey as she daringly describes the results from HRWC’s Water Quality Monitoring Program. Always magical and mysterious, Dr. Paul Steen will spin a story about benthic macroinvertebrates that is not for the faint of heart! The one, the only, Thursday night only, Ric Lawson will fill your head with Water Quality data in mere minutes. Last, but not least, Kris Olsson, our Bioreserve leader (wooooo aaaahhhhh) will tell you tales from beautiful, far away lands (natural areas in the ‘shed).

Please register with the man behind the curtain: JFrenzel@hrwc.org.
***


Stonefly Search
Saturday, January 21
9 or 10:30am, for 3-4 hours
Throughout the watershed

We have ordered up the best of winter weather just for you! Enjoy March in January as you help us collect water quality data that supports long-term decisions by our partner organizations and informs much of the program work we do here at HRWC! This year only, with a predicted high of 51 degrees, the weather is going fast! In 2014 it was negative 20 degrees for this event!

Register and info: www.hrwc.org/volunteer/stonefly



How Science-y Are HRWC Scientists? Very.

img_6161We have a very large whiteboard in the conference room at HRWC, and the holidays prompted some doodling across its vast expanse. Suddenly, the Huron River was populated with all sorts of creatures having some winter fun, skating away…you know, like they do.

The scientists loved it – mostly. Just a few quibbles, really, and what struck me was that the concerns were NOT that the scene included Santa and his reindeer, a snowman, and that all the watershed animals were on skates. Oh, no. That was all fine! The two issues were:

  1. the crayfish was skating forward and not backward as nature intended
  2. there was a bear in the scene, and there are no bears in the watershed

The ensuing conversation, while amusing (the 2011 black bear sighting at Hudson Mills was submitted, and rejected, as evidence as it seems he/she was “just passing through”), showed the depth and breadth of scientific inquiry that is the norm at HRWC. We take a good hard look at everything, and that is to the advantage of the river, the watershed and all the creatures in it.

You just can’t get away with fake news at HRWC. A skating bear on the Huron is going to get fact-checked in all directions. A crayfish with forward momentum is simply not right, and all the

Crayfish, skating in the correct direction now

Crayfish, skating in the correct direction now

scientists on staff are going to let you know this (nicely, of course!), and then you are going to get to examine the crayfish poster (yes, we have a crayfish poster!) for information, and the conversation spirals off into what are common to the watershed (virile, northern clearwater and others) and can you eat them like crawdads (yes) and what kind of crayfish are crawdads anyway (red swamp crayfish – invasive to Michigan).

And when you have that level of examination over a cartoon crayfish, you can imagine what happens here on the more serious issues. Impacts of 1,4 dioxane on aquatic life? We are searching globally for the latest science. PAH content of “synthetic” coal tar sealants? We’re on it.

Because that’s how we do things here.

To learn more about the science behind our work, please join us on Thurs, Jan 19, 6-8pm for our Volunteer Appreciation and Season Results Presentation. Through the lens of the Huron’s many creeksheds, HRWC staff will share stories and lessons learned from our 2016 field season at this fun annual event. We will feature 2016 highlights and 2017 plans from our Bioreserve, Fish Habitat, River Bug Studies, and Water Quality programs. NEW Center, 2nd Floor, 1100 North Main Street, Ann Arbor. Register by email: jfrenzel@hrwc.org.

–Rebecca Foster, Development Associate



Community Techniques for Protecting Water Quality

Kris Olsson presents at the December 10 workshop

Kris Olsson presents at the December 10 workshop

Lively Discussions Lead to Learning

Over 60 people from the Huron River watershed and beyond gathered at the Freedom Township Hall to learn about Community Techniques for Protecting Water Quality. Elected and appointed officials from six townships attended the December forum on the vital role local governments play in protecting our region’s lakes, rivers, and streams and the natural areas that contribute to their quality. Attendees also included members of a variety of water protection groups and interested citizens, some driving as far as 200 miles from northern Michigan and Ohio.

Planning for community growth that protects natural areas is the key to ensuring clean water and vibrant communities for residents, businesses and farms. The goal of the forum was to share concepts, ideas and programs and to provide participants with an opportunity to learn from each other what works.

Harry Sheehan, the Deputy Water Resource Commissioner from Washtenaw County led the morning with an important overview on protecting water quality. Then Sally Rutzky and Erica Perry, Planning Commissioners from Lyndon and Webster Townships, communities HRWC has worked with to develop Green Infrastructure maps and plans, shared challenges and unique solutions to water and land protection issues. Monica Day, Michigan State University Extension educator, connected local water quality protection to statewide issues on the news like the Flint water crisis and algae problems in Toledo.

The forum was organized by HRWC, Mchigan State University Extension, Freedom Township, Pleasant Lake Property Owners Association, Michigan Lake and Stream Associations, the Washtenaw County Water Resources Commissioner, Citizens Respecting Our Waters, and Washtenaw County Emergency Management.

Read about the event in The Sun Times News and the Manchester Mirror.

Forum presentations are available at HRWC’s Green Infrastructure page.

HRWC has received funding from the Knight Foundation to provide Green Infrastructure Planning Services to local governments.  This includes a workshop where residents and officials map out their community’s natural areas and greenways, an audit of their zoning ordinance, master plan and other policies, and technical support in enhancing policies to protect water quality and natural areas. If your local government would like Green Infrastructure Planning Services, email Kris Olsson or call her at (734) 769-5123 x 607.



Thank you

Huron River at Island Lake State Park

Huron River at Island Lake State Park by Ted Nelson

Kindness matters. We experience that every day through our donors. It comes in the mail, through an email, in a Facebook post, or my favorite–fan mail notes included with year-end gifts that encourage us to keep doing the work. All from the kindness and generosity of our friends, members and donors. I know many people think of donations as “support” and  it is that. But to me, it the person’s kindness that makes the gifts of support happen.

We continue to build a future on hope in a rapidly changing world. We know how, because the Huron River Watershed Council takes the long view and stands up for what is right for our home river.  It is an environmental success story, built over fifty years, that has been a powerful force for good in our watershed community.

Thanks to your generosity HRWC has built a strong track record of upholding protections, advocating for our community’s safety and health, investigating  our home waters and teaching tomorrow’s scientists. We are able to stand strong for our free-flowing Huron River and ensure ample clean water for the 650,000 residents of our watershed. Together we make a difference every day for clean water in our community.

During this season of caring, and just before the late December madness really sets in,  I wanted to thank all of you for your many acts kindness to HRWC. Thank you ever so much.

Happy Holidays,

Margaret Smith

Development Director

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