Posts Tagged ‘Flat Rock’

News to Us

In this edition of News to Us find a wealth of local news including the economic impact of the Huron, proposed park improvements in Flat Rock, smart technology research for stormwater management, Rover pipeline troubles and the future of Peninsular dam in Ypsilanti. On the national stage read a piece on the Lake Erie algal blooms and review a list of all the environmental protections at risk under the current administration.

The Huron River near Flat RockThe Huron River Worth Billions Of Dollars To Local Economy New Report Reveals
Through our River Up! program, HRWC commissioned an economic valuation study to better understand the value of our river and natural resources. Elizabeth Riggs discusses the results of the research and the release of a new report with 89.1 WEMU’s, Lisa Barry.

Flat Rock ponders $1 million ‘river walk’ improvements along Huron River
Flat Rock has engaged an architecture firm to consider riverfront improvements along the Huron River near Huroc Park. HRWC is excited to see projects that improve river access, recreation and safety like this one.

Pipeline Company Cited For Spilling Gas-Water Mix Into Local Wetland
Energy Transfer, the company currently installing the ET Rover pipeline in Livingston County, has been cited for an incident that spilled a water and gasoline mixture into a wetland in Pinckney. HRWC has been in contact with the DEQ to keep up on actions associated with the incident and remediation.

So, Ypsilanti, should we repair or remove the Peninsular Dam?
Read an interview of Laura Rubin by Mark Maynard on the potential for removing the Peninsular dam in Ypsilanti.

NSF awards $1.8M to help develop smart stormwater system
HRWC partner Branko Kerkez, University of Michigan College of Engineering, was awarded funding to pursue the development of smart technologies to better manage stormwater. Kerkez and his team have been piloting one of these systems in the Mallets Creek watershed and will continue work in the Huron under this new grant.

52 Environmental Rules on the Way Out Under Trump
With so much news coming out of the federal government these days it has been hard to keep track of exactly what actions the Trump Administration has been able to push through. This article gives a succinct and thorough look at environmental rules and regulations either overturned already, in progress or under consideration. This list is long and troubling and will undoubtedly grow with Pruitt, who in his previous role sued the agency more than a dozen times, at the helm of the EPA.

Miles of Algae Covering Lake Erie
Once again, Lake Erie is turning green. This nearly annual explosion of algal is making national news. The New York Times reports that while this year’s bloom is low in the toxic algae that shut down Toledo’s drinking water supply, the size of algal blooms are growing. Phosphorus, agriculture and the Maumee drainage area are called out as the primary contributors to the problem.

News to Us

pointe-moullieIn news of interest to us here at HRWC, we’ve seen more coastal wetlands now under protection near the mouth of the Huron River and a new business is in town in the lower reaches of the river as well. American Rivers lays out a path for removal of dams to reduce loss of life from dam failures. And two articles take a look at the two sides of climate change, how it is impacting us now (or in this case, how it is impacting birds) and what we, as a global community, are doing to solve the problem.

Two donate property to Detroit River wildlife refuge
A 43 acre complex of wetland, woodland and some agricultural land has been added to a complex of sites that creates the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge. This parcel sits at the outlet of the Huron River near the Point Mouillee State Game Area where the Huron empties into Lake Erie. This refuge is home to many resident and migratory birds and helps clean inland waters heading into our Great Lakes.

How our unseasonably warm fall is affecting migratory birds
Weather pattern affect species differently, some more than others. Experts from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology discuss how our warm fall temperatures impact bird migration. Those most likely to be impacted are species that rely more heavily on temperature cues.  Others rely more on waning daylight to cue migration.

Removing Dams Can Save Lives
Many dams in the US were built decades ago and are now persisting beyond their lifespan. This article highlights the importance of removing or repairing aging dams to reduce risks to people.  Several major storms this year resulted in multiple dam failures in areas affected. American Rivers goes on to articulate a solution to the problem including modifying dam safety program requirements and making more federal funding available.

The past two weeks are a perfect illustration of what “solving” climate change will look like
This article shares some hopeful news that indicates on a growing number of fronts, countries are acting on climate change. Within the last few weeks, you may have run across these headlines. Canada established a nationwide carbon tax. While the Paris Climate Agreement was forged in 2015, it was not ratified until this month and thankfully, it included the US and China who were late to sign the deal. And finally, a global deal was established to phase out hydrofluorocarbons, a really potent greenhouse gas used for cooling. Keep up the good work people of the world!

New coffee, tea, specialty gift shop opens in Flat Rock
One of the Huron River Trail Towns has a new business ready to serve you.  If you are paddling, fishing, picnicking or otherwise enjoying the river near Flat Rock, stop by the Blue Heron Trading Company and say hello. Its businesses like this that keep our trail towns vibrant, welcoming places to take a break from the river and refuel.

News to Us

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DIA InsideOut exhibit in Flat Rock – Huroc Park

Our monthly news roundup provides some watershed stories covering a fun event in Flat Rock and emerging research on the dioxane groundwater contamination in the Ann Arbor area.  Bridge Magazine published an in depth article on the rising profile of County Drain Commissioners.  And two new reports provide a look at how climate change is being addressed in planning efforts nationwide and is likely to impact public health in Michigan.

InsideOut exhibit brings museum-quality artwork to Flat Rock
Check out a unique art exhibit in one of the Huron River Watershed’s Trail Towns. For the second year in a row Flat Rock is displaying replica’s of fine artworks this summer through the DIA’s InsideOut program.  This year you can see 8 paintings at locations throughout the town.

Professor says dioxane probably has reached Huron River already
Dr. Lemke of Wayne State University has been studying the Pall Gelman dioxane plume since 1998. He recently presented results of some modelling efforts that show a more nuanced range of possibilities for the movement of the contamination in Ann Arbor’s groundwater. The article illustrates further the need for better monitoring and solid planning for many potential scenarios about the path and time it will take for the dioxane to reach the river. (Note: While we think this is important news to cover, the headline here is misleading. There has been no evidence to suggest the plume has reached the Huron yet and the city of Ann Arbor regularly tests Barton Pond for dioxane.)

Why on earth is Candice Miller running for county drain commissioner?
This article discusses the role of county drain commissioners (sometimes known as water resource commissioners as they are in Washtenaw and Oakland Counties) and how this elected position is becoming higher profile in light of growing issues with water quality and water infrastructure. The Flint water crisis, combined sewer overflows, beach closings, and Great Lakes water quality are bringing much needed attention to our states aging water and sewer infrastructure.

Cities trying to plan for warmer, wetter climate
A researcher at the University of Michigan conducted a review of climate adaptation plans around the nation.  These plans are intended to determine what is necessary to create a town or city that is prepared for the impacts of climate change and able to bounce back quickly from these impacts.  While more communities are completing plans, they are falling short on implementation. How these strategies will be funded and who is responsible for carrying them out remains an area of adaptation that needs attention.

Changing climate conditions in Michigan pose an emerging public health threat
Additional new climate change research coming out of Michigan focuses on the human health impacts. “Michigan Climate and Health Profile Report 2015: Building resilience against climate effects on Michigan’s health” chronicles the many ways that more heat and more heavy rain events can affect our health.  Respiratory diseases, heat related illnesses and water and vector borne diseases are areas of concern.

Art along the Huron

Enjoy trail-side masterpieces in Milford, Dexter, Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti and Flat Rock.

Art along the Huron River!

Portrait of Postman Roulin, Vincent van Gogh at Gallup Park in Ann Arbor.

August through October, the Water Trail’s five Trail Towns are exhibiting high-quality reproductions of masterpieces from the Detroit Institute of Arts at riverside venues. Brought to you by the Huron River Water Trail and the DIA’s Inside|Out program. Each community will feature the installations at their local events. You can view many of the artworks as you paddle! And most (there are three pieces in each community) are within easy walking or bike-riding distance. MAP/EVENT DETAILS. #huronriver #DIAInsideOut

Canoe Imagine Art LogoIn Ann Arbor, Canoe Imagine Art (CIA) is a public art project that re-purposes canoes retired by the City to celebrate the history and attributes of the Huron River and/or the City’s park system. Four works of art were selected through a juried and public voting process for temporary installations along the Huron River. Check them out at Broadway, Island, Bandamer and Gallup Parks! They are stunning. #huronriver #a2riverart

Art along the Huron!

Pedal, Paddle, Run, Fish . . .

River and RiverSide Recreation! Take Your Pick June 7-8!

In addition to the fabulous line-up of Huron River Summer Recreation Events hosted by HRWC, and there are a number of opportunities to get outdoors and enjoy the River.

Paddling the Huron

Photo: Leisa Thompson, seek The Ann Arbor News

June 7. Flat Rock to Oakwoods Metropark Pedal & Paddle. 10am-2pm. Pedal a family-friendly one mile from Huroc Park to Oakwoods Metropark on the newly completed paved Flat Rock-HCMA Connector trail then jump into the Huron River for a 30-minute paddle.

Group pedal kick-off, ailment 10am at Huroc Park, 28600 Arsenal Road, includes bike inspections, a scavenger hunt, local bike vendors and a Trikke carving vehicle demo. While at Oakwoods, park your bike in a secure corral and join the National Trails Day Celebration (ends at 4pm) where the afternoon will be filled with a wide variety of activities for the entire family including hikes, kayaking demos, birding walks, geocaching, “how-to” discussions, prize drawings, entertainment, and much more.

All activities are free, but onsite kayak rentals are $10 for 30-min (until 2pm). Hosted by Riverside Kayak Connection, Huron River Watershed Council, Downriver Linked Greenways, City of Flat Rock, Friends of Oakwoods and Oakwoods Metropark.

June 7. Hudson Mills Metropark to Village of Dexter Run. 9am. Celebrate the Grand Opening of the newest segment of the Border-to-Border (B2B) trail with a 10k race and fun run/walk that will be enjoyable for all ability levels – bring the whole family! The race will start at Hudson Mills, North Territorial Road entrance. The 6.2-mile scenic route will take you along the Huron River to the finish line in the Village of Dexter at Mill Creek Park where you can enjoy entertainment and refreshments after the run. Free shuttle buses will transport participants back to the starting point. Pre-register online or at the event beginning at 7:30am

Fly fish the Huron River.

Fly fish the Huron River.

June 7 and 8. Schultz Outfitters Fly Fishing Demo Days. 10am-6pm Sat, 10am-5pm Sun. This event brings together some of the most respected talent and brands in the fly fishing industry for two days of FREE education and fun. There will be on-stream casting and fishing demonstrations in the park each day, along with classes and seminars at Schultz Outfitters fly shop, a used gear trade and deals galore!

 

So, get outside and ENJOY your River! More recreation opportunities are posted at huronriverwatertrail.org.

Groundbreaking today in Flat Rock for trail connector

BikeAtDexterHuronBridgeFLAT ROCK — The culmination of more than 10 years of work will be recognized at 4 p.m. today at Huroc Park with the groundbreaking for the Flat Rock-Oakwoods connector trail. HRWC will be there to celebrate the work of many partners over the past decade who made this important link happen. In addition, we’ll kickoff the Huron River Water Trail Paddlers Companion in this Trail Town.

Sponsored by the Downriver Linked Greenways Initiative, the one-mile trail will be the final piece of the east-west connector trail. The project includes construction of the path from Huroc Park to Oakwoods Metropark in Huron Township, work at a railroad crossing and route signage.

Funding for the $684,300 trail is provided by federal funds and a local match from the Michigan Department of Transportation and the Department of Natural Resources.

The 24-mile east-west route stretches from Belleville Lake to the shores of Lake Erie. It encompasses nearly 20,000 acres, runs through four metroparks and follows the Huron River. In fact, just a few undeveloped trail miles in Van Buren Charter Township separates the downriver route from the Border to Border Trail system in Washtenaw County, an eventual 35-mile contiguous non-motorized path along the Huron River.

The ceremony will feature remarks from Rodney Stokes, special adviser for city placemaking for Gov. Rick Snyder; Vince Ranger, grant coordinator for the Michigan Department of Transportation; Mayor Jonathan Dropiewski; Tom Woiwode, Community Foundation Southeast Michigan’s Greenways Initiative director; John McCulloch, Huron-Clinton Metroparks director; Elizabeth Riggs, Huron River Watershed Council deputy director; and Anita Twardesky, co-chair of greenways initiative.

U.S. Rep. John Dingell (D-12th District) is invited to attend.

Join us today at 4 p.m. to help celebrate the realization of a vision where residents and visitors come together to live, work and play on the shores of the Huron River.

For more information about the water trail or RiverUp!: www.huronriverwatertrail.orgwww.riveruphuron.org

Finding a Better Way

The most difficult dam portage on the river

A big part of building the Huron River Water Trail means making the portages around dams safer and easier for paddlers. Everyone agrees that the portage of the Flat Rock Dam in the City of Flat Rock is the most difficult. The designated portage is to boat to a concrete pillar next to Flat Rock Metal and then haul yourself, your canoe or kayak and gear several feet vertical to perch on the pillar. Then proceed on foot a few yards to a locked chain link fence (avec barbed wire) and hope that you remembered to call the company ahead of time to arrange access. See the problem?

This past week, the work group investigating the portages along the Huron River walked the area to figure out a better portage. We are working with HCMA, the City of Flat Rock, Flat Rock Metals and others to figure out a more accessible way for paddlers to enjoy the Downriver reach of the Huron River. In so doing, we’ll be attempting to balance access to river recreation and water trail town businesses with costs and property owner interests. We anticipate having portage concepts sketched out during the winter.


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