Posts Tagged ‘pipeline’

News to Us

In this edition of News to Us find a wealth of local news including the economic impact of the Huron, proposed park improvements in Flat Rock, smart technology research for stormwater management, Rover pipeline troubles and the future of Peninsular dam in Ypsilanti. On the national stage read a piece on the Lake Erie algal blooms and review a list of all the environmental protections at risk under the current administration.

The Huron River near Flat RockThe Huron River Worth Billions Of Dollars To Local Economy New Report Reveals
Through our River Up! program, HRWC commissioned an economic valuation study to better understand the value of our river and natural resources. Elizabeth Riggs discusses the results of the research and the release of a new report with 89.1 WEMU’s, Lisa Barry.

Flat Rock ponders $1 million ‘river walk’ improvements along Huron River
Flat Rock has engaged an architecture firm to consider riverfront improvements along the Huron River near Huroc Park. HRWC is excited to see projects that improve river access, recreation and safety like this one.

Pipeline Company Cited For Spilling Gas-Water Mix Into Local Wetland
Energy Transfer, the company currently installing the ET Rover pipeline in Livingston County, has been cited for an incident that spilled a water and gasoline mixture into a wetland in Pinckney. HRWC has been in contact with the DEQ to keep up on actions associated with the incident and remediation.

So, Ypsilanti, should we repair or remove the Peninsular Dam?
Read an interview of Laura Rubin by Mark Maynard on the potential for removing the Peninsular dam in Ypsilanti.

NSF awards $1.8M to help develop smart stormwater system
HRWC partner Branko Kerkez, University of Michigan College of Engineering, was awarded funding to pursue the development of smart technologies to better manage stormwater. Kerkez and his team have been piloting one of these systems in the Mallets Creek watershed and will continue work in the Huron under this new grant.

52 Environmental Rules on the Way Out Under Trump
With so much news coming out of the federal government these days it has been hard to keep track of exactly what actions the Trump Administration has been able to push through. This article gives a succinct and thorough look at environmental rules and regulations either overturned already, in progress or under consideration. This list is long and troubling and will undoubtedly grow with Pruitt, who in his previous role sued the agency more than a dozen times, at the helm of the EPA.

Miles of Algae Covering Lake Erie
Once again, Lake Erie is turning green. This nearly annual explosion of algal is making national news. The New York Times reports that while this year’s bloom is low in the toxic algae that shut down Toledo’s drinking water supply, the size of algal blooms are growing. Phosphorus, agriculture and the Maumee drainage area are called out as the primary contributors to the problem.

News to Us

Many breweries in the area rely on Huron River water.  Credit: John Lloyd

Many breweries in the area rely on Huron River water. Credit: John Lloyd

In local news, listen to radio interviews with two HRWC staff  on our environmental education work and the addition of a new dock at Peninsular Park.  A new report identifies nature as a best defense against severe storms and flooding.  Also, land and water conservation is on the ballot throughout the nation and craft brewers are uniting around clean water.

Mother Nature Offers Best Defense From Floods and Storms Mother Nature is one of the best defenses against damage from large storms and flooding.  Protecting our forests and wetlands provides benefits far beyond beauty and biodiversity.  A recent National Wildlife Federation report explores the benefits of land protection as a flood control strategy. HRWC’s Bioreserve Program, Green Infrastructure initiatives and riparian buffer protections work all contribute to the watershed’s natural ability to lessen the impacts of storms in our area.

Freshwater Health: Caring for our rivers, lakes and streams and their aquatic inhabitants and surrounding communities WCBN’s It’s Hot in Here program this week includes three interviews on freshwater issues affecting the Great Lakes.  HRWC’s Volunteer and Stewardship Coordinator Jason Frenzel discusses our education programs and community engagement beginning around the 45 minute mark.

Craft brewers join the fight against natural gas pipelines Craft brewers understand the importance of clean water. After all, beer is 90% water.  Brewers in the Huron River watershed have been great partners to HRWC over the years. This article highlights a national initiative to unite craft brewers around water quality issues. This article is an interesting read and highlights one of the many less obvious benefits of clean, plentiful water.

Voters Will Decide On Billions For Land Conservation  On Election Day, voters will be deciding whether or not to support land and water conservation throughout the nation. Some of the biggest initiatives are in California, Florida and New Jersey.  Many local level initiatives to support the preservation of open space are being put in front of voters as well. In fact, Washtenaw County residents will vote on a millage renewal for county parks.  The Washtenaw County Parks system has contributed parks, preserves and trails that improve recreational opportunities, erosion and stormwater control, pollution prevention and the beauty of our watershed. You can learn more about the county parks system in The History of Washtenaw County Parks and Recreation Commission video.

New Dock For Ypsilanti’s Peninsular Park As part of the RiverUp! program, a new dock has been installed at Ypsilanti’s Peninsular Park replacing a dock that had fallen into disrepair making river access and recreation difficult. This is part of a larger initiative to encourage river and trail recreation in the Huron River watershed, particularly in five “Trail Towns” along the Huron River Water Trail including Ypsilanti.

News to Us

2014_05_23_Greenhills_teaching_(2)_-_smallIn News to Us this edition, sildenafil HRWC receives a grant to teach students about the river and a new app allows citizen scientist to record invasive species locations.  Also, Great Lakes Echo produces a podcast reviewing the month in Great Lakes environmental news. Finally, the oil and gas industry makes headlines again in our area.

Grant Will Help Huron River Watershed Council Take Classroom Learning Outdoors HRWC’s Volunteer and Stewardship Coordinator, Jason Frenzel contributes to a piece highlighting a recent grant we received to work with K-12 students throughout the watershed to get them out in the rivers, learning how to sample and building an understanding of the condition of our creeks and streams.

To catch a predator: Citizens enlisted to track invasive species  Here at HRWC we are proud of our citizen scientists.  They do much to help support our mission and protect the natural resources of our area.  Now there is another way you can contribute right through your smartphone.  MISIN, or the Midwest Invasive Species Information Network, has developed an app that lets you report locations of non-native species.  With a lot of eyes on the ground (and in the water), MISIN can gain insights into the spread of invasives and how to stop them.

Great Lakes in review: mayors on algae, restoration update This great podcast series recently came to our attention.  Great Lakes Echo is producing monthly podcasts summarizing the month in environmental stories from around the Great Lakes.  If you want to stay up to date on regional environmental issues, tune into this series.  The most recent podcast covers September including the Summit on Water Resources lead by the region’s mayors and spurred on by the Toledo drinking water ban, and updates to the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative which now require projects incorporate climate change adaptation.

We continue to see a lot of news on oil and gas issues both within the Huron River watershed and the broader Great Lakes region.  Here are two recent articles on a proposed pipeline that would be built through Washtenaw and Livingston Counties and how local communities are responding.

News to Us

ErieAlgaeNews to Us this week finds more on local activity around recent interests in oil and gas development in our watershed in the news lately.  Also, a new shop opens in Dexter catering to river and nature enthusiasts and a couple of updates on water pollution issues reminding us to keep diligent on both new and known pollutants.

Judge denies injunction against oil well in Scio Township For those keeping tabs on oil well drilling in Scio Township, an injunction filed to delay oil exploration drilling in Scio Township was denied in Washtenaw Circuit Court. The delay was sought to have more time to assess potential environmental damages associated with the drilling.  The next step may be to take the issue to Ingham County Courts.

Open house in Chelsea draws dozens to learn about proposed natural gas pipeline  An open house was held in Chelsea to allow residents to get more information about a proposed pipeline that will run from Ohio to Canada through parts of Washtenaw, Lenawee, Livingston, Oakland, Macomb and St. Clair counties.  The Rover Pipeline project is scheduled to begin as early as January 2016.

Bailiwick’s Outdoors in Dexter offers apparel for adventure sports and fly fishing gear for enthusiasts It is great to see new businesses open that grow our own local “blue economy”.  A new river-based recreation shop has opened in Dexter.  If you have paddling, fishing, birding, hiking or equestrian needs, consider stopping by and supporting our friends at Bailiwicks.

Big Toxic Algal Bloom Again in Forecast for Lake Erie. As a reminder that we cannot assume that once a condition improves it will stay improved – Lake Erie’s algae bloom issues from the 1960’s and ‘70’s have returned in recent years.  This year is no exception.  Forecasts predict the algae bloom this summer could be one of the largest in the past decade. Phosphorus from fertilizers, sewage and industrial waste is the main culprit driving the blooms.

Plastic microbeads could be banned from personal care products in the U.S. by 2018  In a previous News to Us we shared an article about an emerging pollutant to our waterways. Plastic microbeads are used in many cosmetic and personal care products.  They make it through many wastewater treatment facilities and into our waters where they are ingested by wildlife and release known toxins. Look for products with natural alternatives such as almonds, sea salts and apricot pits. Legislation has been introduced at the federal level. Illinois is the first state to ban products with plastic microbeads.


Donate to HRWC
Calendar
2018PrintCalendar
Huron River Water Trail
Coal Tar Sealers
RiverUp
Donate to HRWC
SwiftRun
rss .FaceBook-Logo.twitter-logo Youtubelogo