Posts Tagged ‘invasive species’

News to Us

Pointe Mouille where the Huron enters Western Lake ErieMany bright spots in local news affecting the Huron River with everything from new parks to better water housekeeping. News from the State and Federal level is a little less heartening. Read a report on the proposed State budget and efforts to get Ohio to take action to improve conditions in Lake Erie.

Brighton city manager: ‘We’re behind in some things’ – The new city manager in Brighton is putting emphasis on several tasks that will benefit the Huron and its residents. The city manager intends to implement a goose control and waste management program that aligns with state best practices. Restoring regular stormwater system maintenance is also on the list of priorities. Both of these initiatives should result in water quality improvements in the Huron.

Environmentalists want western Lake Erie declared impaired – Environmental groups are suing EPA to encourage a decision on whether or not to declare western Lake Erie in Ohio an impaired waterway. The decision, which has dragged on, would give stakeholders a clearer path forward to fix problems with the Huron River receiving waters that have led to significant algal blooms in recent years.

State says Watershed Council shouldn’t be in on Gelman plume legal talks  Gelman has challenged the trial court’s December ruling that the County, Ann Arbor, Scio Township, and HRWC can intervene. Michigan Attorney General’s office filed a response to this appeal supporting Gelman’s position that HRWC should not be granted standing. That challenge is happening while settlement negotiations continue. A decision should be made in May or June whether the challenge is successful. In the negotiations, as in the motion to intervene, HRWC is focused on the system for detecting whether dioxane may reach the surface waters in harmful concentrations, and how Gelman should respond if dioxane were detected at those harmful concentrations

New park amenities abound across Livingston County – Learn about how recreational opportunities are expanding in Livingston County this year including additions at Kensington Metropark, Brighton Mill Pond and along the Lakelands Trail. The weather is beautiful.  Get out and play!

DEQ on losing end of Michigan legislature’s 2018 budget drafts – Earlier this month, the Michigan legislature submitted its draft budget for 2018. In this budget millions are cut for toxic site clean-up and mitigation of basement vapor intrusions. Neither the House nor Senate supported the Governor’s proposal to continue the Clean Michigan Initiative (CMI) by shifting a portion of the gas tax revenue to the CMI. Other cuts include the proposed expansion of lead and copper rule drinking water systems, training for Flint water utility staff, and funds for the DEQ Air Quality Division. This is in addition to the potential loss of up to 200 positions from DEQ if the current administration does follow through on its proposal to slash EPA funding by a third.

Stop dumping your exotic fish in Michigan waters – Just a reminder that release into local water ways is not an appropriate way to deal with an unwanted fish. These fish can become a nuisance or worse. The article shares some appropriate ways to get rid of problem fish pets.

News to Us

mudsnail

New Zealand mudsnails are a new invasive species in Michigan Rivers. Photo credit: USGS

In this edition of News to Us: a new invasive affects inland waterways of Michigan, Green Oak tries to resolve flooding issues, a new report quantifies the gap between what we are spending and what we need to spend on our water infrastructure, and a new House Bill threatens to reduce Michigan’s power to protect our natural resources.

Invasive New Zealand mudsnail reaches Au Sable River
One of Michigan’s most recent aquatic invasives is on the move.  While we have not found it in the Huron River yet, we are concerned about the damage the mudsnail can cause. Your diligence can help avoid its further spread. Cleaning boats, waders and even shoes as you move from one waterbody to the next can reduce the chance of spreading the mudsnail to new rivers (especially if you have been on the Pere Marquette or Au Sable). For more information, and to report new sightings of New Zealand mudsnails to the DEQ and DNR, go to www.michigan.gov/invasives.

Flooded or forced out of their homes?
Repetitive flooding has plagued one corner of Green Oak Township for some time now.  And the problem is getting worse. The Township recently applied for funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to help acquire homes at fair market value and allowing the land to function as a floodway without risk to personal property or human health.

Q&A: PSC’s Jon Beard discusses how much Michigan should be spending on its water infrastructure
This is an interesting interview about a study that estimated the amount of money Michigan needs to spend on drinking water, stormwater and wastewater in order to meet the growing demands of aging infrastructure.  The research found Michiganders should be spending between $284 and $563 million more each year on water infrastructure.  While this is a lot of money, with about 10 million residents in the state, the gap could be filled by increasing water bills by as little as $3 to $6 each month.

‘No stricter than federal’ bill aims to make Michigan mediocre again
This blog put out by the Michigan Environmental Council provides commentary on House Bill 5613 which attempts to bar Michigan from passing rules stricter than an established federal standard. Read this blogger’s opinion on the implications of the bill to Michigan’s water and other natural resources. Since the writing of the blog, the House has passed the bill.  It is awaiting a vote by the Senate.

News to Us

flowing waterThis edition of News to Us provides updates on a couple of emerging threats to Michigan’s water – Asian carp and fracking.  Also, learn where Osprey go to escape the winter and how water can be the basis of a strong and growing economy.

Osprey from Michigan refuge arrives in Cuba  You may recall, back in September, we shared some news about our local Osprey getting a new accessory (Osprey to wear backpacks in Southeast Michigan).  Well, it seems our friends have traveled long and far.  Read this article to find out where for local Osprey are wintering this year.

Michigan DEQ proposes new fracking regulations in light of environmental, health concerns  In response to growing public concern, MDEQ has updated regulations on hydraulic fracturing, or ‘fracking’.  The new regulations require more reporting and closer monitoring of high volume fracking operations.  While this is a step in the right direction, there is still room for improvement to ensure our waters are protected from depletion or contamination from fracking.

Water, water everywhere in Michigan – but is it enough?  While water in Michigan hardly seems scare, this article highlights why we should not take this for granted and how even in a state with abundant water resources, we can experience scarcity.

Asian carp reproduce in Great Lakes watershed  Scientists have found evidence that the non-native Asian Carp has reproduced in the Sandusky River in Ohio.  While individual carp have been found in the Great Lakes watershed in the past, this is the first time it can be confirmed that they are here and reproducing.

Great Lakes state playing catch-up in effort to build water-based economy  You may have, by now, heard the term “Blue economy”.  It is the idea that water and all of its uses can form the basis of a burgeoning economy.  While there are many examples in Michigan of communities making strides toward a robust blue economy, one study shows Michigan is lagging behind other Great Lakes states in this area.  RiverUp! is an example here in the Huron River watershed of building a water-based economy.


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