Posts Tagged ‘Huron River Water Trail’

News to Us

High flows on the Huron River in Dexter Township

High flows on the Huron River in Dexter Township

Read a sample of local to national news pieces that caught the eyes of HRWC staff over the past month.  Water quality, local flooding, recycling water and summer recreation are topics covered in this edition of News to Us.

Caution urged along swollen rivers, streams  Water levels are still high throughout the watershed.  Please use extra caution if on or near the rivers until water levels have subsided after recent record rainfalls.

The Huron River Water Trail  As we gear up for another warm weather recreation season here Michigan, HRWC’s Elizabeth Riggs blogs on how to optimize your experience on the Huron River.

In US, Water Pollution Worries Highest Since 2001  Results from a recent Gallup poll show that water is on the minds of the American Public.  Take a look at this year’s numbers and how it compares to other years.

Beer Brewers Test A Taboo, Recycling Water After It Was Used In Homes  Companies are innovating water use and conservation, especially in areas where water scarcity concerns are growing.  Water can be safely reclaimed, for example, and a group of brewers in the West are helping to debunk taboos associated with this practice.

What’s at Stake in Trump’s Proposed E.P.A. Cuts  The Environmental Protection Agency has been the subject of much attention since the proposed White House budget was released last month. This article does a good job of digging into the weeds of what is likely to be affected by the proposed cuts. You may be surprised with breadth of responsibilities the EPA has and what we stand to lose should the cuts make it through budget negotiations. The loss of nonpoint source grant funding will directly impact the work of HRWC as will a number of other cuts. Nonpoint source grants provide funding for a significant number of our projects.

 

Paddle Ypsi on the Huron River National Water Trail

Open for business this summer is the renovated canoe and kayak launch at Frog Island. Ypsilanti’s Frog Island Park on the Huron River, located just north of Depot Town between Forest and Cross, is getting a makeover. This access is located at river mile 40.7 on the Huron River Water Trail.

Since last November, invasive shrubs were removed and sight lines to the river opened up, hand rails on the stairs were installed, concrete cleaned, and an access path and launch graded and gravel added. The access is safer and easier to use. A new river-themed mural is in the works, too.

Stairs, path, and railing have been restored at the Frog Island Access

Stairs, path, and railing have been restored at the Frog Island Access

Try out the river in Ypsilanti and visit Frog Island. This section features mature tree canopy, newly restored fish habitat, and an unimpeded paddle trip into Ford Lake. Put in below Dixboro Dam, paddle the meandering river past the St. Joseph Mercy Hospital campus, portage the Superior Dam and Pen Park Dam, and see Ypsilanti from the water before taking out at Frog Island. Or start your trip at Frog Island and paddle past Riverside Park and Waterworks Park before entering Ford Lake. Paddle the upper end of the lake before taking out at Loon Feather Park. For a longer trip, paddle Ford Lake and take out at the new dam portage into North Hydro Park.

Ypsilanti Fall River Day on Sunday, October 9th offers a great opportunity to see the city by water in your own kayak or rent one that day.

Before your paddle, check out our podcast series that profiles three waterfront locations in Ypsilanti each with an important role in the city’s position as an automotive powerhouse:

  • The Faircliffe Home on Ford Lake
  • Motor Wheel
  • Water Street

Learn more about the Automotive Heritage Trail District.

HRWC leads this RiverUp! project, in cooperation with the City of Ypsilanti. Thanks to Bill Kinley for championing this project, with support from the Walter J. Weber Jr. Family, and many individual donors. Much gratitude to Washtenaw County Convention and Visitors Bureau and Margolis Landscaping for the many hours of labor and materials generously given to this renovation. Thanks to all of the community volunteers who kicked off the work in November 2015.

Paddle Ypsi!

Quiet Water Symposium, March 5

Plan your summer paddling adventures!

Algonquin canoe routes, the Georgian Bay coastline, the Grand Traverse Islands, the Northern Forest Canoe Trail, Canada’s Yukon and Teslin Rivers, Lake Superior, the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, the Huron River and more will be featured by over 30 presenters at the 21st Annual Quiet Water Symposium.

Join the Huron River Water Trail for “RiverUp! in Moving Pictures,” a screening of 4 short films, produced by RiverUp! in Moving Pictures, 2pm, Betsie RoomHRWC with 7 Cylinders Studio that tell the story of our river’s revitalization. Talks from outdoor recreation experts on camping secrets, top backpacking treks and kayaking college campuses in Michigan, packing, portaging, safety, cycling and nature photography along with demonstrations and exhibits round out the day.

Date:  Saturday, March 5, 2016

Location: The Pavilion for Livestock and Agriculture Education
(Farm Lane, south of Mt Hope – on the campus of MSU)

Time: 9am to 5:30pm
(RiverUp! in Moving Pictures, 2pm in the Betsie Room)

Admission: Adults $10.00; Students (with ID) $5.00; Under 12 Free

Exhibitors include clubs and nature centers, handcrafted and historic watercraft, conservation and watershed groups, outfitters, liveries, and biking, hiking and water trails.

Come to QWS to plan your summer paddling adventures!

FOR MORE INFORMATION: www.quietwatersymposium.org

Widget-HRWTThe Huron River Water Trail is a 104-mile inland paddling trail connecting people to the Huron’s natural environment, its history, and the communities it touches in Michigan’s Lower Peninsula.

News to Us

Steelhead Trout Credit: flickr/surrealis_uk under Creative Commons license.

Steelhead Trout Credit: flickr/surrealis_uk under Creative Commons license.

News highlights from the last month include several articles on the amazing recreational destination the Huron River has become, an update on Ann Arbor’s progress on climate change and some wonderful successes on the path toward eliminating a harmful pollutant from the waterways and neighborhoods of the Huron.

Huron River a hidden gem for steelhead.  This article gives a nod to the Huron as a solid enclave for fishing steelhead. Steelhead trout are stocked in the Huron River by the Department of Natural Resources below Flat Rock Dam. Learn a few secrets from a frequent angler of steelhead in the Huron.

(Next) Best Paddling Towns: Ann Arbor, Mich. Inside the paddling hub of the 104-mile-long Huron River Water Trail.  Canoe and Kayak magazine recently highlighted the Huron River as a paddler’s destination. The article talks about the Huron’s five trail towns and how paddlers can find short or long trips in both rural and urban settings. 

Ann Arbor falling short of goals to reduce carbon emissions. Members of the Ann Arbor Climate Partnership, including HRWC’s Executive Director Laura Rubin, presented to Ann Arbor City Council this month on the status of the City’s Climate Action Plan.  In short, while progress on some of the recommendations in the plan has been made, Ann Arbor has not achieved reductions in greenhouse gas emissions.  More support from City Council and the residents of Ann Arbor are necessary.

VBT approves ordinance banning coal tar driveway sealant. On December 17th, 2015, the Van Buren Township Board of Trustee unanimously approved the adoption of an ordinance banning the sale and use of coal tar and other high PAH sealcoat products. It is the first ban in Michigan that restricts application of these common driveway sealants anywhere in the municipality and the first ban nationwide that prohibits not only coal tar based sealants but also any sealant product with high levels of PAHs, a class of compounds linked to cancer and other health impacts in people and aquatic organisms.

Rep. Pagan introduces bill to ban coal tar sealants  That same week, Representative Kristy Pagan (D-Canton) introduced a bill to ban coal tar sealants to the State Legislature. The bill had its first reading in December and was referred to the Committee on Natural Resources. Track the progress of this bill at http://legislature.mi.gov/doc.aspx?2015-HB-5174. 

Both these articles share great news for Michigan’s rivers, lakes and wetlands, and the citizens of the Huron River watershed.  

 

Paddling the Huron River Water Trail

Take a look at another short film released by the Huron River Watershed Council — one of a series that share stories of the renaissance happening along the Huron!

“Paddling the Huron River Water Trail” showcases this recently designated National Water Trail along its 104 miles of prime paddling for canoes, kayaks, and stand-up boards. The film features stunning aerial and underwater footage and focuses on three adventures: a solo canoe trip in the pristine Proud Lake area to the north; a group paddle trip in the dynamic Hudson Mills section; and a father and son kayak trip near Flat Rock and into Great Lake Erie.

Paddling enthusiasts can plan their own adventures with the newly released Second Edition Paddler’s Companion, a waterproof map flip book of  the entire Huron River Water Trail or use the trail’s online interactive maps to plan a trip or explore.

RiverUp! is a strategy to realize the goal of a vibrant, robust, and restored river as a destination for residents, visitors, and businesses.  7 Cylinders Studio of Ann Arbor worked with HRWC over the fall and winter months producing “Paddling the Huron River Water Trail” to share the vision of RiverUp!, a plan for the Huron River’s future.  Additional films in the RiverUp! Stories feature two of the Water Trail’s five Trail Towns, sharing fly fishing with local expert Schultz Outfitters in Ypsilanti and the transformation of  Dexter’s waterfront.

Michigan trails get a boost with new legislation

A few weeks ago I promised to share an update on the status of the bills package being considered in Lansing to expand the definition of ‘trails’ to include water trails and provide funding to support trails across the state.

Today, Governor Rick Snyder signed the bills, now Public Acts 210-215 of 2014 that redefines the designation process of special trails in the state and supports the development of a statewide network of multiple use trails and water trails.

The bills give the director of the Department of Natural Resources the authority to name trailways as “Pure Michigan Trails,” water trails as “Pure Michigan Water Trails” and towns as “Pure Michigan Trail Towns,” pending approval from the Michigan Economic Development Corp. They also allow statewide volunteer activities to include trail enhancement programs in support of trail upkeep and maintenance.

More from the State’s press release here.

Our RiverUp! work includes establishing the Huron River Water Trail and developing Trail Towns in each of 5 largest towns on the river. We’ll all pretty excited here about this new investment that can benefit these efforts. Anita Twardesky, our Trail Towns Coordinator, shares, “What an exciting time for trails in our State! Southeast Michigan is home to many water trails, Trail Town programs and bike paths. Our trail systems are poised to become a great addition to the statewide system.”

We applaud this legislation and look forward to working with the Department of Natural Resources to ensure that Southeast Michigan is well-represented to help showcase our unlimited outdoor recreation activities.

Delhi Rapids on the Huron River Water Trail. Photo courtesy of T. Janiuk

Delhi Rapids on the Huron River Water Trail. Photo courtesy of T. Janiuk

Investment in Trails Promises Big Payoff

Huron River Watershed CouncilMichigan’s reputation as the #1 Trails State, and Water Trail development, have the potential to grow significantly with increased funding and broader programming through proposed updates to the Michigan Trailways Act.

I have been following these proposed updates of the state’s valuable Trailways Act to a broader statewide network of multi-use trails, including water trails. In March, I testified before the Senate Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Committee in support of the bills package citing the benefits to the Huron River communities located along the Huron River Water Trail. You can read my testimony here.

The updates to the Michigan Trailways Act enjoy broad support from trail users and organizations around the state. However, the $2.5 million appropriations for trails is in jeopardy. The House of Representatives version of the budget removed nearly $11 million from this bill, including the trails funds, from the Executive and Senate versions of the DNR budget for FY 2015. The Conference Committee needs to reconcile the differences. Now is the time to contact the Conference Committee legislators by phone or email to urge restoration of these dollars into the budget. The Michigan Trails and Greenways Alliance has compiled the contact information and sample comments.

I will share updates and a final outcome here as they become available. 

Anita Twardesky joins RiverUp!

LinkedIn profile imageThe Huron River Watershed Council is pleased to announce that  Anita Twardesky has joined the RiverUp! initiative as Trail Towns Coordinator. Anita will guide the five largest communities on the river – Milford, illness Dexter, Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti, and Flat Rock – in becoming Trail Towns, trailside and gateway communities that are true recreational destinations. The Huron River Water Trail is a project of RiverUp!, medical the initiative to make the Huron River a new “Main Street” for the river towns where residents and tourists recreate, live, commute, do business, and treasure their riverfronts.

Anita is an experienced and respected recreation and trails professional. She  also serves as Public Relations & Community Outreach for Riverside Kayak Connection in Wyandotte where she is responsible for promoting outdoor recreation, paddlesports, and the ecotourism in the region. Previously, she served as Parks & Recreation Director for the cities of Woodhaven and Flat Rock. Her appointments include co-chair of the Downriver Linked Greenways Initiative, Chair of the Trails Committee for the Michigan Recreation & Parks Association, and a member of the State Wide Advisory Group Michigan Water Trails.

The Huron River Water Trail is a 104-mile inland paddling trail connecting people to the river’s natural environment, its history, and the communities it touches in Michigan’s Lower Peninsula. The Huron River Water Trail is a consortium of interested groups and communities, and is a project of the Huron River Watershed Council and RiverUp!.

The Start of Something Big

In the summer, HRWC will launch a new project called RiverUp! with the Wolfpack, an action-oriented group of conservation-minded leaders who operate together under the auspices of the National Wildlife Federation and Michigan League of Conservation Voters. RiverUp! is nothing short of a renaissance for the Huron River that encompasses three broad objectives —

  • Invest in Recreation on the Huron
  • Improve the Ecological Health of the Huron
  • Turn our Riverfront Communities toward the Huron
  • You’ll learn more about this ambitious project in the coming months. We have a long list of projects that need to happen in order to make paddling the 100 miles of the Huron River an awesome experience (learn about the Huron River Water Trail). But we began small this past weekend with opening up the portage trail at the Superior dam in Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti.

    Our friends at Phi Gamma Delta fraternity, Alpha Phi Chapter (University of Michigan), helped us kick off RiverUp! by volunteering their afternoon to improve the neglected portage trail at Superior dam. The students used loppers and handsaws to clean out overgrown branches and remove small stumps; raked the trail; marked the edges of the trail with logs found onsite; and removed litter. Their youthful enthusiasm powered them through the afternoon until the job was complete.

    The work day was Phase I for the Superior dam portage. HRWC and Wolfpack are working on Phase II, which will bring much-needed improvements to the take-out and put-in. To learn more about the efforts at Superior dam portage, the RiverUp! project, or how to become a steward of the Huron River Water Trail, contact HRWC Watershed Planner Elizabeth Riggs.

    Thanks to the City of Ann Arbor Natural Areas Preservation (NAP) program for loaning tools and gloves; St. Joseph’s Mercy Hospital for meeting and parking space; and John Carver and Ray Pittman for pitching in.


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