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2015-16 Snapshot

We often write about our projects and give updates on how we are achieving our goals.  Today, we are sharing a quick, at-a-glance summary of what we accomplished from 2015-2016.

You can also learn about our 2016 accomplishments at our upcoming Annual Meeting on April 27, 5:30-7:30 pm at the Ann Arbor District Library, Traverwood Branch, 3333 Traverwood Drive (at Huron Parkway). Program staff will present results and answer questions. And we will celebrate some very special HRWC contributors with Stewardship Awards. This event is open and free to all, refreshments included.  Please join us!

2015-2016 Annual Report Infographic

Want more details now? Check out our 2015-2016 Annual Report.

 

Honey, We Got the Grant!

Breaking news here at HRWC headquarters: we have been awarded a grant to implement our Honey Creek Watershed Management Plan! In 2012 -2013 we researched within the Honey Creek watershed to identify problems. Primarily, we scoured the watershed looking at bacteria levels and fingerprinting their sources. Honey Creek’s poor water quality is due to high bacteria levels, which can threaten human health.

Target areas for reducing bacteria contamination in Honey Creek

Target areas for reducing bacteria contamination in Honey Creek

Our research led us to some recommendations on how to protect and restore the area in ways that address the most critical issues. We are pleased to report that the Department of Environmental Quality has provided funding for this work within the Honey Creek watershed. Our Honey Creek project starts this autumn and will end in autumn 2019.

With this grant, we will:

  • Hire canine teams (dogs!) to sniff out sources of human sewage waste in 2 key areas of the watershed. Once the dogs help us identify specific areas with septic issues, we will work with Washtenaw County and property owners to help them address problems. We will also do homeowner outreach on ways to maintain septic systems.
  • Scoop that poop! We will raise awareness of the importance of removing pet waste from yards and parks, and install pet waste pick-up stations. Pet waste is one of the predominant sources of bacteria in Honey Creek.
  • Mark 1,000 storm drains and hand out door-to-door flyers to raise awareness of their direct connection to Honey Creek and what people can do to capture and reduce runoff pollution.
  • Identify farmers in the Middle Huron watershed for a Farmer Advisory Council (FAC). The FAC will advise HRWC and project partners on future plans to address bacteria and nutrient reduction from agriculture including innovative approaches such as “pay for performance” subsidies for nutrient and bacteria reduction practices.

For questions about our new project, contact Ric here.

This project has been funded wholly or in part through Michigan Department of Environmental Quality’s Nonpoint Source Program by the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

Follow the Huron River Water Trail to Adventure . . .

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Best way to get to Kensington

Get carried away on the north side of the ‘shed

One mcanoe at pick upy my favorite vacation days last summer was when my hubby and I rented a kayak from Heavner’s for an afternoon ride on the river. Heavner’s is in the Proud Lake State Rec Area so our trip started with an ‘instant, just add water” effort for gaining immediate access to nature.  We loved pushing off the dock and into a peaceful path bordered by tall grasses and trees.

A+ for excellent buffer zone!

A+ for excellent buffer zone!

After a very easy paddle for about 2 miles, we entered Milford, a cute town with a gorgeous bridge that looks like a portal to Narnia. If we had known about the River’s Edge Brewing Company in Milford, we certainly would have stopped for a beer. Our oversight was a novice mistake that can easily be avoided now that our Huron River Water Trail site is launched.  [Novice tip: before heading out, go to the site to find fun places to stop, sip, and snack in any trail town. Here’s a link to Milford’s page–check out the links in the map to plan ahead for fun places to visit.]

You can camp here!

Check out our Huron River Water Trail signs. We posted these at one of the four spots for river access camping on the Huron:  Canoe Camp

Past Milford, we spotted a pair of humans — less abundant in this area than farther South — who delighted us by “pulling over” to remove trash from a party spot along the shore. I was pleasantly surprised to see one of them sporting a Huron River Watershed Council volunteer t-shirt.   (Way to represent, peeps!)

Kensington pick upWe ended our trip at the agreed upon pick up spot in Kensington Park and the Heavner shuttle driver arrived on-time to take us back to our car.  The whole trip was very easy and we could have gone for several more miles. Next time, we will!

Have fun, stay safe with these TIPS from the Trail.

Join HRWC for Huron River Appreciation Day, Sunday July 10! Come along on a guided trip of the Huron River Water Trail in Dexter, paddle the Lower Huron from Flat Rock or paddle to Milford from Proud Lake, hear a talk on paddling safety and get a free life jacket, hear a river history talk or learn to fly fish!

toyota_logoHuron River Appreciation Day is sponsored by TOYOTA.

A2’s Mitchell Neighborhood is Growing Green for Clean Streams

Here at our office, we call them “Swifties.” But really we are referring to Mitchell Neighborhood Ann Arbor residents. HRWC is working with these neighbors on a project to capture polluted runoff from rain and melting snow before it can flow into the Swift Run Creek.

Rain Gardens are pretty

Rain Gardens are pretty

We began this project by assessing the health of the creek in 2015. Results give us a baseline so we can return to evaluate the stream’s health after rain gardens are installed and are actively soaking up stormwater.

This pre-project check-up is complete and we have begun phase two, which is to build rain gardens in parks, schools, and street bump-outs in partnership with the City of Ann Arbor. Free assessments are also available to Mitchell neighbors to help them identify ways to capture rain water on their property. Examples include planting rain gardens, trees, and other deep-rooted native plants, using rain barrels, and changing the direction of their roof gutters.  The Washtenaw County Water Resources Commissioner is providing discounts to Mitchell residents who take classes from the County Master Rain Gardener Program, and the project will subsidize rain garden installation.

Miller Ave Rain Garden, Ann Arbor

Miller Ave Rain Garden, Ann Arbor

While this project will beautify the neighborhood and protect its creek, some neighbors have raised concerns about the bump outs, anticipating that they could reduce parking availability and impact traffic. That’s why project partners are using proven methods for choosing criteria for the bump out locations. HRWC will present the plans to the neighborhood for input before they are finalized.

The Swifties are enthusiastic. Six have already taken the County’s master rain gardener classes. As a result, five private rain gardens have been created — see them featured in our Huron River Report, Spring 2016. And we’ve been getting thoughtful feedback and questions from neighbors, like these:

What about flooding? The existing stormwater drainage system is NOT being removed, so if it works for the neighborhood currently, it will continue to do so. The proposed rain gardens will be designed to capture and infiltrate the first inch of runoff. The rest of the overflow will go into the existing stormwater system. This design will improve water quality by filtering the initial runoff from small storms. There currently is no water quality treatment of stormwater runoff from the neighborhood.

Won’t the bump outs take away street parking? Once a preliminary design is drafted, we will present the proposed design and gather input from the neighborhood at a public meeting in April. Streets in the neighborhood are currently much wider than current design standards. However, if there are serious concerns about the loss of on-street parking, the design team will relocate rain gardens. There is quite a bit of flexibility in the placement of street-side rain gardens within the project.

Will they cause traffic congestion? The design team has many years of experience with street projects, including residential road bump outs. Maintaining efficient traffic flow is one of a number of design criteria that are being considered in drafting the plans. The team would like to hear about concerns at specific locations following the initial draft design so that they might alter the design.

Rain gardens seem complicated unless you are a gardener. Do I have to maintain the rain garden if it is on the street in front of my house? Once the gardens are built, they will be incorporated into the City’s Green Infrastructure Maintenance Program, which ensures that all Rain Gardens installed on City property (including the right-of-way area) are maintained, either by residents, volunteers, City/County staff or a contractor.

Award-winning rain garden

Becoming a rain gardener is easy!

As this project picks up speed we will update our project page. Here are links to more information:

Growing Green for Clean Streams in Swift Run Creek project

Swift Run Creek Report (great information on why the creek needs protection)

Ways to Capture Rainwater at Home

Learn more about using native plants and creating rain gardens at the Home, Garden & Lifestyle Show, March 18-20, at the Washtenaw Farm Council Grounds, Saline. HRWC and the Washtenaw County Water Resources Commissioner’s Office will feature information and experts on rain gardens, native plants and shoreline best practices at our booth (E-169). Admission is $5. HRWC has a limited number of complimentary tickets available–please contact Pam Labadie, plabadie@hrwc.org.


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