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Fostering Resiliency in our Tree Resources

This piece was written by guest blogger Mike Kaminski who worked as a intern at HRWC last summer and is currently pursuing a Masters degree in Landscape Architecture from the University of Michigan.

Resiliency is the capacity for a system to absorb disturbance without shifting into a qualitatively different state. In this case, the system we are talking about is the Huron River watershed’s trees and forests, and the disturbance is climate change. Healthy tree communities enhance stormwater infiltration, filter pollutants picked up by rainwater, keep our rivers and streams cool, and help to preserve the overall health of the Huron. Unfortunately, the River’s tree resources may be at risk due to the impacts of climate change and the extreme weather events that are expected to come with it.

With increased temperatures and extreme weather events (especially summer drought), tree species that have long been associated with the beauty of the Huron River watershed will begin shifting their population ranges north to accommodate for the change in climate. Fall foliage characterized by the vibrant reds and golds of sugar maples and beeches will be replaced by the muted browns and yellows of oaks and hickories better suited to these new weather patterns. Even the eastern white pine, the state tree of Michigan, is expected to become more rare in this area.

Fall color of a beech maple forest (left) and oak hickory forest (right)

Fall color of a beech maple forest (left) and oak hickory forest (right)

favorability-chart

Table indicating if the future climate in the watershed will likely be favorable (+), neutral (0) or unfavorable (-) to common tree species

Many potential consequences could result from the loss of these long established tree species. High numbers of urban street trees could be lost that are not well adapted. This could mean high replacement costs for local townships. Loss of municipal services such as enhanced stormwater infiltration, air cleansing, and urban heat island mitigation may occur. With fewer native trees able to survive in the changing climate, we could also observe a loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services from our surrounding parks and forests.

So, what can we do about this? Two years ago, HRWC, the Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessments Center (GLISA), and several local environmental leaders from around the watershed formed the Creating Climate Resilient Communities Project: an effort to address local climate change impacts by building resiliency in the watershed. Among the issues the project chose to focus on were resiliency strategies for natural infrastructure (specifically trees) within the watershed.

Now entering its third year, the Climate Resilient Communities Project has compiled several great resources on improving climate resiliency in the area’s forests and trees. These include a comprehensive report on the state of climate change and its impacts on the local watershed, fact sheets on key tree species of the area, and a report of popular and emerging management strategies for resilience in forest and tree resources. These and many other useful resources have been compiled as a comprehensive toolkit on HRWC’s website.

 



4 Responses to “Fostering Resiliency in our Tree Resources”

  • River Gal:

    What do the symbols indicate in the table of tree species?

  • Hi,
    I printed a copy of this article for my students; however, it didn’t turn out too well. Is it possible for you to send this to me in a PDF or another way? If not, no worries – I will use what I have!

    I am part of a pilot team that is working on curriculum, Michigan Forests & Climate Change, with U of M. I am one of the teachers implementing the program and thought that this would be a good read!

    Thanks, in advance, for your time!
    Margaret

  • Rebecca Esselman:

    Hello Margaret. Sure, I will send you a copy of the article. Also, you can download a pdf of the report: Review of climate impacts to tree species of the Huron River watershed, which has a lot of good information on the topic, at this link http://www.hrwc.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Natural%20Infastructure.pdf. Let us know if you need anything else. We are happy to support your efforts!

  • Rebecca Esselman:

    Thanks for the comment River Gal. The table most certainly needed a caption. It has been added above. The symbols indicate whether future climatic conditions will be favorable (+), neutral (0) or unfavorable (-) to trees that occur in the Huron River watershed.


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